Two astronauts who should have been back on Earth weeks ago have said they are confident that Boeing’s space capsule can return them safely, despite breakdowns.

Nasa test pilots Butch Wilmore and Suni Williams launched aboard Boeing’s new Starliner capsule early last month, the first people to ride it.

Leaks and thruster failures almost derailed their arrival at the International Space Station, and has kept them there much longer than planned.

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In their first news conference from orbit, they said they expect to return once thruster testing is complete here on Earth.

They said they are not complaining about getting extra time in orbit, and are enjoying helping the station crew.

“I have a real good feeling in my heart that the spacecraft will bring us home, no problem,” Ms Williams told reporters.

The two rocketed into orbit on June 5 on the test flight, which was originally supposed to last eight days.

Nasa ordered up the Starliner and SpaceX Dragon capsules a decade ago for astronaut flights to and from the space station, paying each company billions of dollars.

SpaceX’s first taxi flight with astronauts was in 2020. Boeing’s first crew flight was repeatedly delayed because of software and other issues.